Toyota Turns Trash into Electricity at Georgetown Plant

Trash Into Electricity
In an effort to turn trash into electricity, Toyota has plans of burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown.

Waste and energy are two of the major problems we face in the world today. So why not strike two birds with one stone? That’s the question Toyota is asking and that it will put to the test at its manufacturing plant in Georgetown, Kentucky.

The automaker plans to turn trash into electricity by burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown. It installed a generator at the dump that burns the methane and sends electric power to the manufacturing plant via a six-mile transmission line.

When it goes online, Toyota says the system will be able to produce one megawatt of electricity per hour, but that it can be upgraded to output 10 megawatts per hour. This is just one part of the automaker’s goal to reduce the average emissions of its cars by 90% by 2050 compared to 2010.

“The landfill gas generator represents the kind of thinking that our company is asking us to do to reduce our carbon footprint over the next 35 years,” said Kevin Butt, Toyota’s general manager for environment strategies.

So if you want to support a brighter, greener future, come support Toyota at Chip Wynn Motors!

31 MPG Highway Makes Colorado Duramax the Most Fuel-Efficient Pickup Truck

Most Fuel-Efficient Pickup Truck
The EPA rated the 2016 Colorado Duramax at 22 mpg city, 31 mpg highway, and 25 mpg combined, making it the most fuel-efficient pickup truck.

Following the Volkswagen diesel emissions scandal, all eyes were on the new 2016 Chevrolet Colorado Duramax, which underwent stricter testing by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine its emissions and fuel economy numbers.

And, to no one’s surprise at Chip Wynn Motors, Chevrolet isn’t Volkswagen. The results were more than just good: the EPA rated the 2016 Colorado Duramax at 22 miles per gallon city, 31 mpg highway, and 25 mpg combined for the two-wheel drive model.

That’s good enough to take the title of “most fuel-efficient pickup truck” away from the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel, which only gets up to 29 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined. When you put it all together, thanks to the Colorado Duramax’s 21-gallon tank, you’ll be able to go up to 651 miles before needing to stop for gas!

“The new Duramax diesel engine gives customers another choice for handling heavier work and recreational needs—while doing it efficiently,” said Duncan Aldred, vice president of GMC Sales and Marketing. “It’s the very definition of GMC’s professional grade ethos.”