Toyota Sienna Named Top 10 Family Car

Toyota Sienna
Recently, the stylish and impressive 2016 Toyota Sienna was named a Top 10 Family Car by Parents Magazine and Edmunds.com.

The Toyota Sienna is always out to impress, and the 2016 model year is no different, which was recently proven again when the 2016 Toyota Sienna was named a Top 10 Family Car by Parents Magazine and Edmunds.com.

The Toyota Sienna impresses first with its class-exclusive all-wheel drive. It’s the only minivan out there with the all-wheel drive stability you want and the space you need. Edmunds.com agrees, because the Sienna didn’t land on the Top 10 Family Car list without a good reason.

To earn a spot on the family car list, a car needs to rank high in many categories, like quality of ride, safety, comfort, efficiency, kid-friendly features, and more. Even physical attributes like unique styling and appearance make a difference.

“The endlessly roomy Sienna stands above its competitors for two reasons: It’s the only one with all-wheel drive, and the especially user-friendly controls help you stay focused on the road,” wrote Parents Magazine when explaining why the Sienna got the honor.

And they’re right. The 2016 Toyota Sienna is a great family ride. For trips, it’s a great vehicle because it offers up to 150 cubic feet of space. And with the Dual-View Entertainment Center, your kids will never get bored on trips.

Check out the Toyota Sienna today at Chip Wynn!

Toyota Turns Trash into Electricity at Georgetown Plant

Trash Into Electricity
In an effort to turn trash into electricity, Toyota has plans of burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown.

Waste and energy are two of the major problems we face in the world today. So why not strike two birds with one stone? That’s the question Toyota is asking and that it will put to the test at its manufacturing plant in Georgetown, Kentucky.

The automaker plans to turn trash into electricity by burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown. It installed a generator at the dump that burns the methane and sends electric power to the manufacturing plant via a six-mile transmission line.

When it goes online, Toyota says the system will be able to produce one megawatt of electricity per hour, but that it can be upgraded to output 10 megawatts per hour. This is just one part of the automaker’s goal to reduce the average emissions of its cars by 90% by 2050 compared to 2010.

“The landfill gas generator represents the kind of thinking that our company is asking us to do to reduce our carbon footprint over the next 35 years,” said Kevin Butt, Toyota’s general manager for environment strategies.

So if you want to support a brighter, greener future, come support Toyota at Chip Wynn Motors!