The Most Dependable Car Brands from J.D. Power Vehicle Dependability Study

Most Dependable Car Brands
In the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, some of the most dependable car brands are put into the spotlight.

Buying a used car isn’t nearly as risky as it used to be just a few decades ago because vehicles are made to last longer and be more dependable. However, some brands are still a lot better than others. In the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, it highlights the most dependable car brands.

This study followed owners of 2013 model year vehicles and asked them to track how many problems they encountered over the past 12 months. The results are then recorded as problems per 100 vehicles (PP100).

Coming in at the top of the list is Lexus with only 95PP100. The highest-ranked non-luxury brand is Toyota, which came in fourth place with 113PP100. The industry average for this study was 152PP100. Some of the other well-performing brands include GMC, Chevrolet, Honda, Ram, Lincoln, Cadillac, and Volvo.

If you’re in the market for a used car that you can feel confident driving day-in and day-out, this study would be a great place to start. Here at Chip Wynn Motors, we frequently have many of these dependable brands in stock. Our inventory is always changing, so let us know what you’re looking for and we can give you a call when we have it.

Toyota Turns Trash into Electricity at Georgetown Plant

Trash Into Electricity
In an effort to turn trash into electricity, Toyota has plans of burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown.

Waste and energy are two of the major problems we face in the world today. So why not strike two birds with one stone? That’s the question Toyota is asking and that it will put to the test at its manufacturing plant in Georgetown, Kentucky.

The automaker plans to turn trash into electricity by burning methane from the Central Kentucky Landfill in Georgetown. It installed a generator at the dump that burns the methane and sends electric power to the manufacturing plant via a six-mile transmission line.

When it goes online, Toyota says the system will be able to produce one megawatt of electricity per hour, but that it can be upgraded to output 10 megawatts per hour. This is just one part of the automaker’s goal to reduce the average emissions of its cars by 90% by 2050 compared to 2010.

“The landfill gas generator represents the kind of thinking that our company is asking us to do to reduce our carbon footprint over the next 35 years,” said Kevin Butt, Toyota’s general manager for environment strategies.

So if you want to support a brighter, greener future, come support Toyota at Chip Wynn Motors!